S3E2: The Parent Map Talks Parenting Toddlers | Baby's Best Sleep

Resident sleep expert Amanda Jewson is joined by mom & dad duo The Parent Map who are parent & family coaches who not only GET what you’re going through (because they have gone through it too), but they’ve also done all of the heavy lifting so that you don’t have to figure this sh*t out on your own – they’re here to support you & your family work through challenges without yelling or threatening, helping your kids grow into the most amazing humans, capable of happiness & success while keeping the connection, love & future relationship strong between parents & kids.⁣ ⁣Today we’re talking about all things toddlers!
Find them at: https://www.theparentmap.com/ and on IG at https://www.instagram.com/theparentmap/

Voice Over:
You’re listening to the Slumber Party podcast with your host Amanda Jewson, a mom of two girls, a child, an infant sleep expert and general sleep lover! If you’re a tired parent who is desperate for answers or just someone who loves sleep, this podcast was created just for you. Each episode is packed full of tips and tricks to help you maintain your sanity, as well as your social life, during the early stages of parenthood. So grab your headphones, it’s time to get comfy.

Amanda:
One of my number one biggest questions, believe it or not, is not really about babies at all. But what happens after a baby is not a baby anymore. Cat and Adrian are the founders of the parent map, and they’ve created an online way for you to learn how to parent your crazy toddler. It is really, really hard and challenging. Or at least it was for me. We talk a lot about that in this episode. Kat and Adrian  are wonderful, they share some tidbits, some ideas about the course..  It’s, it’s more of a theoretical conversation, but definitely a stepping point for you to hopefully either investigate further with some of the materials that we discussed or with Kat and Adrian, who have done all the work for you, or as a stepping stone to jump into some of my other, more practical podcasts on toddler life. Hello Kat and Adrian, how are you?

Kat & Adrian:
Hi, Amanda!

Amanda:
Thank you so much for joining me. I’m so pumped that you’re on.

Kat & Adrian:
Yeah, we’re really excited. I mean, you know how well you know how we feel about you. So we’re just excited to be a part of this.

Amanda:
It has been an accident this season. Maybe not an accident, maybe subconscious, but lot of my question, people like people who just have general questions have been past clients. And so they all come on and they’ve been very complimentary. And I think at this point people are going to think I’m very like narcissistic and just really want people who like me to be on here, But that isn’t the case. I swear. This isn’t, isn’t the Amanda show! I mean, when we say this, but I’m really excited to have you guys here because you are special special people. So for a long time, I taught in middle school, like, literally for oh, gosh, I want to see, like, almost 10 years, and people would be like, “Oh, my God, you are, you’re a crazy person.” And I feel almost like that’s what you guys are for the baby world right now where you are purposely, mindfully taking on toddlers. Which was my personal, tough spot. And I guess I just want you guys to jump in and tell us what the parent map is all about.

Kat:
Yeah, so I mean, and it kind of is this funny zone of parenting, where, for the most part, the conversation has always been just, you know, put your head down, grit your teeth and just survive it right just through it. And that’s how, that’s where we found ourselves. And so our toddler, who is three and she always gets very upset when. we call her a toddler. It’s so funny. She’s like “I’m a Preschooler!” She’s, when she first started daycare, she you know, there were a lot of changes at home. We had a new baby, or I was pregnant at the time she started daycare. It was her age, and she just came home and she was having these tantrums, and we were just thinking to ourselves. You know what happened to our precious, you know, well tempered little girl. And, you know, a lot of our friends were in that position where they had just gotten out of the toddler stage and their feedback to us would be, you know, kind of what I said before. Just it’s the terrible twos. This is what happens, you know, it passes. And I found personally, I was like, I can’t get on board with that. I don’t want to regard my child is being terrible. And what we quickly found out was that we just didn’t understand her. We didn’t understand her needs. Yeah. So this this started a whole slew of education, self education for us. So I managed to get through my pregnancy and the 1st 2 and 1/2 years of Penelope’s life, our daughter, without reading one single parenting book. And then when this started, I kind of I went, you know, elbows deep into all, any and all resources I could get my hands on so on. And I’m a naturopath by profession, and I went into this a little bit pompous thinking, “Oh, I got it. I know you know, human psychology. I know, based on my experience of patients, I’ve got this” and I, I didn’t, at all because I needed specialized education. So I think, Amanda, you’re, we’ve talked about Janet Landsbury before, the Shefali Tsabary’s book. These were the first resources I picked up, and it became like, this Pandora’s box of resources and you know, then I enlisted Adrian and we started doing courses, and our minds were blown at how little we actually knew.

Adrian:
Yeah. I mean, like I was doing. And before Penelope, I was doing these, self help programs, and I really got into, you know, Tony, Tony Robbins and and really going through all that stuff. And I thought I’d be able to apply it with toddlers, right? It’s, no ball. But, you know, despite all that learning and that development like it, as you know, shocker, it did not translate

Amanda:
With the most unreasonable people on the planet.

Adrian:
It’s like like Kat mentioned way just didn’t understand, you know, we didn’t understand. We were, we were, we were aware of, you know, that there was something going on that we didn’t know, you know, what the process was, how to do it, but we knew that we needed to change something, right?

Kat:
And so with all of this reading an education, we developed a strategy that we started implement with ourselves and with Penelope. And we started to see this, like, night and day changes occurring on a day to day basis for this. All those little things that would otherwise be this momentous, you know, over the top dramatic issue, and we it was kind of one day, Adrian and I were like, we have to share this. You know, I’ve had the ability to take to invest the time in this, and we’re just like we have to. We have to tell everybody about this.

Amanda
Oh and you’ve just, you know, Kat, you said something that really struck a chord with me that,  two things. Number one: I, too, had never read a parenting book before my toddler phase and then suddenly I just wanted all of the parenting books and, like, “Oh, my God, no one tells you.” So then the other part of that was this idea that, you know, we have children and they’re this, like, it’s almost like a societal norm for them to be a little bit of a nuisance. You know for sure. I like, I won’t lie. Yeah, they are in some respects and they drive you crazy, and it’s a really tough time. But it’s also a time where I, too, did not want to resent these, like family members. And I remember there were there were parts where, postpartum with my second. I was just not parenting well and living my life. And I remember having lots of anxiety going to pick up my oldest from day care and being like “Here I go! I have to, like, do this again and it’s gonna be hard.” And you know that became.. I think the danger in that is that for me, anyway, it became this narrative of my life that my kids were hard. This was hard done. And then everything becomes like dull and gray, you know, like

Adrian:

I think you, and, you hit on that too. Like I know you have said like if you go into a situation like your sleep training expecting it to be bad

Kat:
Like I remember you saying that, like so many times to me, right!

Adrian:
Yeah, and so if you expect it to be batting your and you’re projecting all that that energy, it’s going to be bad, right? So it becomes this typical thing where it’s just not stopped.

Kat:
And I think that none of us know what we’re doing, right? Like it’s not in parents… For all of the population that says that, you know, being a parent, that transition into parenthood is natural. Sure, the survival components of parenthood are natural, you know, the parenting goes beyond keeping your kid alive, as we all can appreciate. But, you know, I think there are so many points to what you’re saying is bang on. Yes, the energy that you project. Yes, this idea that we don’t know. But then how to take action on that is to educate yourself!

Amanda:
Yeah, and I think that, you know, I think I’ve seen the hugest change in my children when I was able to kind of focus on myself, which feels counterintuitive. But then you realize you know it. Generally, a lot of us, our parents weren’t really thinking about parenting.  You know, they were all kind of doing it a little bit differently than we are. And then we’re sort of like, “uh okay, I’m just going to do these things,” and no one sort of lets you know that the more you work on you, the more your children will feel that that you are healthy. There’s not this, like dark cloud in the room, and suddenly their, their whole demeanor changes like it’s insane.

Kat:
Well and when we were doing all of this, you know, reading and self education and stuff, we, a large proponent of the course or a big a big foundational component of it, is the education around your child’s cognitive and emotional development. Because that’s where we were initially disconnected from Penelope, is that we didn’t get and then we soon came to realize that there are only certain things that she was actually capable of from a purely brain, you know, derived perspective. So that impacted our expectation of her.

Adrian:
And that’s the biggest thing you could do for your kids, right? Like the biggest, one thing that we’ve kind of found, one of the biggest things you, the biggest problems being a parent is having expectations of your children because you protect your expectations on and then they don’t feel, they create this belief inside them that they’re not good enough, because you always have this expectation? Right?

Amanda:
Could you give, yeah, I totally, I totally with you. Can you give me an example of what that like a common example that you’ve encountered of that. Those expectations that that people tend to put on their kids.

Kat:
So, for an example, after Theodore, so our youngest is almost eight and 1/2 months. And after he was born, I had this I don’t know if you felt this Amanda after your second, but what I found was immediately I regarded her as an adult because even from the juxtaposition of size of them, you just feel all of a sudden their hands were massive, their feet were massive, and my thoughts around what she was capable of also shifted. And so I had these expectations. “Oh, come on. Don’t do that. You know better.” Yeah, this is “you know how to do this. There’s no reason to get upset.” And I had this increased level of, of this expectation for her, and I soon found that she was starting to become sheepish. Like she was getting embarrassed, and I could see that reflected in her, but the divide was that it was so massive between what she was capable of in those moments, what she needed and what you know, she was making that mean, which was I’m not good enough.

Adrian:
Yeah, and so that’ll translate. You know, that translates for not just that one aspect, but into everything in her life where she’s not good enough. So she’s doing something and she struggles maybe a little bit. She will reinforce the fact that she’s not good enough, and then she maybe she’ll stop trying or she’ll get like, Kat saying she’ll get sheepish, or she’ll get shy or, you know, she’ll kind of retreat into, yeah and into something that’s familiar and comfortable. And that’s like, that’s a very common thing. I mean, I had I had that growing up, up until not long ago, I had that “I’m not good enough,” and it was, it’s wildly pervasive in every aspect of your your life is an adult even, because those air foundational beliefs that every human being creates, whether it’s a limiting belief or not so

Kat:

And that, that’s where the course takes you next, is how to not only recognize your own limiting beliefs in your own life, which most of which are formed in our own childhoods or reformed but also how to catch the limiting beliefs that your Children already have formed how to reverse them to eliminate them and how to prevent them from happening in the future, which in our minds is the most impactful thing you can provide your child.

Adrian:
Which translates into self esteem, right, like being competent, being capable, being good enough, being important to themselves so they can any challenge and still kind of rock through it, right? Be resilient through it. And that’s what that is. That’s what self esteem does. It allows that, that you can handle any problem, any any issue, any obstacle and keep moving forward and with curiosity and with, like, okay, and not making it something that means something about themselves or in something negative about themselves, which will limit their abilities, right.

Amanda:
Well, and I I think that what I’m hearing and you know, I think we’ve all you know, you and I have done the same readings, but I feel like, what I think parents struggle with the most is the idea of  “Is my kid normal?” And so if you go online and you’re on a Facebook group of thieves work mom group or parenting group and there’s like, “you know, my kid drives me nuts and they do this and da da da” and you know, the biggest feats of learning I’ve taken from my guru’s is our our children are their own spirit and their own person and they’re, they’re little passionate or chilled out selves, right? Like they are who they are and it’s up to us to kind of respond to that person, not try to mould them.

Adrian:
And not judge it. Just kind of like you said, respond and not judge who they are, because I think that’s a big issue. The expectation, that judgment, you know, it kind of it. It makes them contract and, like retreat like we were saying.

Amanda:
And even, you know, to the parent, I think it places a lot of pressure on parents to be doing, doing, doing when really, we need to be responding to that child instead of like, I think that there’s a lot like, you know, using Janet Landsbury as an example, it’s like we’re there to support, love and keep our children safe. They are who they are, and we’re not really responsible for much more than the care and love and protection of our child. Like a lot of this stuff is really just going to come. And I think when I think when parents have the permission or like the understanding that like, your person is your person! I think that can take a lot of the weight off of, like, “What am I doing? Like, what activity are they in or what? You know, How many flutes can they play? Are they you know, they get so mad at this thing or they’re they’re scared at this. It’s so weird.” It’s like, No, they’re just who they are.

Kat:
Well and I think it’s like, I would, I personally would argue the fact that the pressure that we feel as parents is completely self imposed and has something to do with our own beliefs, right? ‘Like I’m not a good enough, I’m not good enough unless I am a perfect mom.’ Well, I can’t be a perfect mom. I’m stressed out. What are all these things? These are, you know, conflicting pieces of advice. Oh my gosh, I’m overwhelmed. And the thing is, is that if we it’s, it’s, it’s way more simple than we think it is. But you don’t necessarily, you know, regard parenting with the same benevolence and respect we do any other profession right or any other skill set. And it is a skill, especially when you have incomplete stuff as a person, we’re gonna get triggered by, you know, outbursts and, you know, quote unquote disrespectful back talk, because there is something inherently in you as a belief that is getting triggered emotionally by that. And so much of the work is about us, because we have to act as the, the organizational center, the rational center of the brain for our children, because that of their brain is not developed until they are in their early twenties, which is terrifying. Thinking you’re sending kids away to university with an underdeveloped brain… That explains a lot of my experience! Yeah, but a lot of the pressure is self imposed and it doesn’t need to be pressure filled. It’s exciting, it’s, it’s liberating. It’s empowering to learn more about how we can best serve our children to your point, guide them without feeling like we’re failures, if and when they do, you know, exert their power or they do, you know, get trip wired emotionally, those are all natural parses of this relationship.

Amanda:
Awesome. And I totally agree. And I think that, like, that was my biggest ah ha moment from Shefali Tsabary’s book, which was you know, what, your reaction has everything to do with you. So take five minutes to think about why that is, that is making you feel this way. And what, instead of like that lack, you know, coming. She always talks about coming from that place of lack what is actually there that we can focus on. So when I want you to talk to me because obviously I’m I am buying what you’re selling. You know, I which I had this when I was struggling. And I know that a lot of lot of my listeners, a lot of my clients or second time parents and they’re coming to me because it is really overwhelming. What? How’s your course structured? What are they gonna learn? Tell me everything about it. Tell me how I can give you all my money.

Kat:
So, like most things, I think especially as parents were looking for convenience. And so our course is virtually delivered. So it’s all online, accessible at your convenience, through video along with corresponding exercises and, and handouts to keep you engaged and to apply the knowledge that you are learning to your real life. Because that’s one thing we found with reading all these things is that it was all well and good in theory, but we didn’t know how to apply it.

Adrian:
Like the application aspect was so difficult. Yeah, yeah, theoretical, but like, how do you do it in a real life, you know, real life because it’s so different and you want so many. There’s so many things thrown in, so many wrench is thrown into the actual the process, right? You’re like, “Oh, wait, you, we weren’t supposed to respond that way.”

Kat:
So the idea is is that we lay the groundwork for knowledge, so creating the or we lay the groundwork for consciousness and awareness. So, you know, we’re assuming that any parent that is well, okay listening to your podcast, but that is going to have the interest and have the thirst for knowledge is going to be somewhat self aware and conscious to the fact that they need help because we all help, right? That’s number one is that understanding and then, you know, providing the knowledge that every parent needs to again understand their child, understand their experience, what they’re going through and what they’re capable of is that lays the groundwork as well, right? So when you know, when you have that knowledge, empathy is greater and so is patience, because you’re thinking “OK, Actually, my toddler doesn’t know better about this and doesn’t have the capacity to make sense of it.” So we provide that education and then that, we, we provide the groundwork in the understanding around beliefs. And this is, Amanda, this is Adrian’s bread and butter, the belief section and limiting police how other forms and how to completely eliminate them. He’s constantly trying to eliminate my beliefs, which, as you can imagine, when your partner it trying to help, You’re like, “just let me wallow. Let me dig my heels in”. So the beliefs and the acknowledgment of them. The formation of them and the elimination of them is a huge part of the course

Adrian:
Yeah, well, I mean, because,  you know, beliefs, like all behavior is believe driven and so kind of saying it in another way. Like what we believe makes us behave a certain way, right? We didn’t believe something. Like, for example, you know, people that are getting sleep trained like mothers. If they if they believe that they weren’t a good mother, if they let their baby cry to get sleep trained, they wouldn’t do it right?

Kat:
Or if If I need to even needed your help to begin with, I must be a failure.

Amanda:
Failure as a mom because I can’t get my kid to sleep.

Adrian:
So whereas if they believe, for instance, that they know that their baby sleeping and them sleeping will make the baby healthy? That’ll make them healthy. It’ll make the entire environment incredible, incredible for the, for the entire family. And how that kind of help the entire family thrive. That’s a completely, right, those two beliefs change the entire behaviour of somebody where they would be like, “You know what? We need Amanda. And that’s what Kat was like “we need Amanda and let’s get this going!” right. And, so those beliefs are so critical and the thing that we work on for the kids, for the kids and the parents like that was mentioned earlier is it’s wild. But from the from the time the baby’s are born to the age of about seven, these kids create these foundational beliefs. These foundational beliefs are essentially self esteem. Beliefs that will drive, will be with them for the rest of their lives. Unless they eliminate them in a separate thing, which we also work on and I work on. But you know it’s important and it all comes down to language. Language is so important, right? So language and energy and how you kind of respond to your to your children is an important piece, because if you react as opposed to later, as opposed to responding. Reacting is with emotion and you’re not really thinking. It’s just kind of, you know, and response is you think, you process, you think, and then you speak you know, in an, in an informed way away with you know some regulation.

Kat:
So we move through that and then, you know, arguably the most important take home because all of the knowledge Adrian always says, knowledge is potential power. So in order to really get the gains, to get the change, to get the life that I really wanted, you have to take massive strategic.

Amanda:
We lost you for a second Kat. Can you say, I lost you at knowledge is potential power…

Kat:
And so is a good Internet connection, So the end of that is that you know, in order to get that in order to turn that knowledge into power, we need to create or need to have massive strategic action. So we provide the full set of tools that every parent needs in order to master every day challenges with their child. And that takes into account everything that you learn from all the other sections in very specific terms. So you’re having a hard… So say, for instance, you know your challenge with your child is getting them to bed. That’s a very, very common one. So you have not only you know the basics behind it. So why your child isn’t able to tap into the rational, I”t’s time to go to bed. You’re going to be tired if you don’t sleep” to, you know, how to talk to them, a script, how to distract him and get him out of that survival, limbic reptile brain response that looks

Adrian:
Where it’s just emotion

Kat:
It’s just pure emotion. You cannot rationalize when they’re in that state. To, you know, different strategies that work with different Children. So even strategies I may use with our daughter, they might not work for Adrian and vice versa. So there’s a ton of resources we provide the parents in order to get success.

Amanda:
Amazing. I love that, but I love the idea of a script. I needed a script!

Kat:
You were saying that you wish you’d had this. We wish we would have this before Penelope was born. Because understanding pieces. Oh, my gosh is critical.

Amanda:
It really is. So I remember, you know, Winnie was losing her mind about something and I was losing my mind about something, and I just, like, went down into my kitchen. I sat on the floor and I grabbed my iPad, and I downloaded, like, the top two toddler parenting books, and I was like, “AAAHHH” and literally I just wanted someone to tell me something and to even have a script and have like, “Okay, When I go upstairs, I’m going to say this, this is how I’m going to repair this”  as well, which I think is really important.

Adrian:
Yeah, Yeah, the repairing thing. That’s one thing, actually that’s a great point. We also So listen, we make mistakes. All parents make mistakes, like everyone. This isn’t about perfection. This really isn’t. And we actually provide things that will help you repair what you, what you just did or what you do when you, you know, react as opposed to respond. It’s, you know, which is important, right? Like no. Like we said, nobody’s perfect

Kat:
And it doesn’t really serve your child strive for that either.

Adrian:
To seek perfection, because it’s not real right?

Amanda:
Well and what a role model for them, like I will be perfect. You will be perfect. Like that’s too much.

Kat:
Well no. And yeah, it’s just it’s the, the idea is to build empathy and to, you know, we we, one of the points we educate on is that when your child quote unquote misbehaves, it’s their way of communicating that they need help developing that particular skill. They’re not trying to push your button. They’re not trying to bother you. They don’t know that you had a hard day at work. Even if you tell them you had a bad day, they don’t, they don’t really know what that means.

Adrian:
They can’t comprehend that!

Kat:
And that kind of helps things too, like, this child isn’t trying to, you know, just absolutely ruin the whole dynamic of the house. They’re just trying to build their skills. And that’s what we’re there to help them do. And you know, that’s skill building. Also, you know, it’s amplified when you make a mistake as a person, they learn from that as long as you can explain it, you know? Yeah, I think growing up, I had, so many things weren’t discussed. So all I got was surface level. What, heard, what I heard, but nothing was explained to me. “Okay, well, you know, I was frustrated because of this. It wasn’t about you, it was about your behavior or mommy’s behavior or daddy’s.” You know, it was just this big dramatic thing that I internalized about it being about me

Adrian:
And that, that helps for the children and they understand that, okay, mistakes are okay, mistakes are good, where you need to learn from them. So it’s, you take it, you make a mistake and you just get learned from them as opposed to “Oh, that was, that was a mistake. Or it’s the end of the world,” right, which is, and same thing with my family. Like that’s kind of was like, “Oh, no mistakes.” You know, mistakes were weren’t a good thing. And and then you develop a belief across that when you get older, your neck mistakes and fillers or bad and that, yes, is a, you know, pervasive thing in society now where people are stressed out kids are stressed out it in high school because they have their, you know, this anxiety about school and being perfect making failure, right?

Amanda
Yeah. I mean, I dealt with that first hand, and it is an issue like it’s a big issue. And I worked in all girls education. It’s a big issue for girls specifically, I couldn’t have made progress with my daughter because this morning, like I mean, I felt like at moments when my parents were, like, annoyed or like not in their best selves, like I would feel afraid to approach them. And this morning, like we just had a series of unfortunate events and I was definitely in a mood and my daughter was like, “You seem mad as like I am, but it’s not at you” and she goes, “Maybe you didn’t have a great sleep last night.” I was like, “Yeah, maybe!” But I don’t think it was a moment where we were just both being really human. And she’s like, I’m not taking this on and I’m letting her know she doesn’t need to and she wasn’t afraid to kind of like broach that subject with me, which I’m like. I just need a minute and a coffee and we’ll get back there and she’ll be like, “okay!”

Kat:
And that allows for, I mean, it’s, you know, like that particular example you just gave you could unpack that, and they’re in so many different ways. The number one, the fact that she feels comfortable in seeing you, not in the greatest mood and still being able to approach you and say “What’s up?” And that’s empathy building. But that also shows her comfort and safety with you, which is beyond important. It’s like that safety thing is so huge for children. And that was a consistency thing. But that’s also obviously, you know, attributed to how you communicate with her. And second, as she gets older and as she gets into those teenage years, you know, the groundwork has been laid. That conversation, there’s nothing taboo here. The conversation is open for us, and there are different possibilities to this. You know, this isn’t about me, this is about you, mummy and or maybe the that, you know, your pillow was lumpy or no, I actually no, that’s not the case from watching your stories, I know you’re pillow is killer.

Amanda:
High end sleep products

Adrian:
No, But you know what? Like you know, the other thing about what you, what she said to you and your conversation was that it wasn’t about her. And that’s a critical piece that a lot of people mistakenly speak to their children about, where they’re mad at them when it’s about them, it’s, you’re upset about what they’re doing. And that distinction is huge. It changes that – it goes from fear, the child becoming fearful of the conversation because they’re mad at, because Mommy or Daddy is mad at me. Mommy and Daddy are mad at what I did. They love me no matter what, which is a critical, important thing for children to understand because they don’t understand unconditional love. So they need to constantly be reinforced with love. But so anyway, so that was, that’s amazing, because that’s that’s really lets you know you’re already ahead of the game.

Amanda:
The reason why I bring that up is because I don’t think it was always this way. And I think what is really helpful for parents to know. And what I don’t think I really realized is that, you can change everything, right? Like everything is changeable and everything is fixable and everything is repairable. So if you’re feeling like it’s ‘all is lost’, all is not lost. Like you can repair everything and it pretty amazing, especially in these and these few years, right? Like you can you can turn it all around. Okay, We’re almost, we’re getting to the point of a good nap, which is you. No one’s gonna listen anymore to me if if there is going to be a sleeping this long. But I wanted to, how can people find you? How can they sign up? Where do I sign up:

Kat:
Okay, so we’re at TheParentMap.com and you can find us on instagram @theparentmap, where we, you know, we give daily little tips and tricks about being a parent, being a human and everything in between. And, our website provides all the information that you need to sign up for the course.

Adrian:
Yeah, It’ll give you the kind of details and and we’ll also if you send for newsletter you’ll also get emails with all kinds of great stuff, more along the lines of our instagram, but just with more detail and more helpful tools and tips

Kat:
And I just want to say, Amanda, thank you so much for having us on. You obviously know how much we love and appreciate what you do and what you’ve done for us and and really we’re here because you want to shake up the current parenting culture. We want to impact the future by shaping our children, you know, so they can learn, grow and develop those core beliefs that we’re talking about to set them off for success in in every aspect of their lives. No small feat. But we’re on a mission.

Adrian:
Yeah, for sure

Amanda:
Yay! I love that guys!  Well, thank you. Thank you for being on, letting me talk about things that only, like, five people talk to me about, and we’ll talk soon.

Kat & Adrian:
Thank you again for having us!

Voice Over:
Thank you so much for joining us for another episode of some of hottie. If you’re ready to help you, a little one gets asleep that they need And get your nights back while you’re at it. Make sure to check out Amanda’s signature D i Y sleep training courses or work with her directly. But more details hit over. Two babies based sleep dot com Don’t forget to hit. Subscribe Like in review. Happy sleeping, everyone